Keeping it Classy

 Black and white printing is a classy way to portray depth of emotions and “color”. When using only black ink on white paper, your images have the ability to appear in the broad range of grayscale which gives it that classy look. What allows the printed copy and photos to appear in grayscale are the thickness of the dots. There are always 300 dots per inch (dpi), but the thickness of the dots allows for more ink to be placed on the paper – more ink, the more black it appears.

Prairie Country, Then and Now is a book about railroads and trains between the time frames of 1969-1973 and 2007-2010. The book is in all black and white. One of the authors of Prairie Country, Then and Now, Robert P. Olmsted, had this to say about the printing of his book;

” . . . I would like to thank the pressmen who handled the job, as it was obvious every effort was made to give me the ‘black’ blacks I feel are essential to good B&W work.”

Check out the photos below of Lance Detwieler, the one color pressman, and Dwight Voth, a Printing Consultant!

The buttons he is pushing allow him to adjust the density of the ink.

This photo is of Lance and Dwight Voth, Mr. Olmsted and South Platte Press' Printing Consultant, checking out the press sheet.

Lance using a loupe, a high-powered magnifying glass used by printers and those in the graphic industry. He is analyzing the quality and precision of the dot pattern.

Lance is putting in a new plate for the next set of press sheets. The plates are made of a flexible aluminum that has had the image put onto it using Computer to Plate (CTP) technology. The blue areas on the plate receive the ink to print the photos and text onto the paper.

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