What are the costs to print and bind my book?

It is important to have an expense and income plan prior to ordering your book. We advise that you get a quotation in a range of quantities, and consider what the retail price might be. Our book-publishing consultants are happy to help you with these proposals. Mennonite Press offers an offset line of printing for book publications of 500 or more, and a digital line for authors that are considering a limited number of printed books. There are numerous variables that impact the cost of publication—read a preview of Self-Publishing: Planning for a Better Book, by Roger Lloyd Williams for more details.

81% of American Households Open Direct Mail

Myth: Americans throw away most of the direct mail they receive, unopened. A 2006 USPS Household Diary Study found that only 16 percent of American households choose not to open direct mail. The vast majority, 81 percent, opens and reads or at least glances through the direct mail they receive.” (NewPage & Education, 2010). Make the most of your direct mail campaigns and incorporate a QR Code and your social media sites.

QR (Quick Response) Codes are a way for your customer to continue engaging with your business. All they have to do is have a smartphone, download the app to scan the code, then scan it! Link your QR Code to digital business cards, landing pages to a website, videos, forms for the customer to fill out to enter a contest, coupons . . . something that gives them a reason to scan the code. If you’ve recently opened a restaurant, sent out a mailer announcing your opening with a QR Code on it that links to a discount for their first visit, or ask them to follow you on Twitter or “Like” you on Facebook. Whatever you decide to use, just be sure to tell them what you want them to do . . . otherwise that code and  those social media icons have no call to action. But do QR Codes really work? In market research done by Comscore, 6.2 percent of all smartphone users do scan the codes. (Melanson, 2011). So let’s do some math . . . If you send a mailer to 1,000 potential customers, 810 of them will have opened and/or actually read it, and at least 50 of them will have engaged with you some how offline.

Recently, a college used a postcard to gather information about potential new students with a QR Code on it. On the back it was a blank form for them to fill out and mail back to the school. If the potential student didn’t want to take the time to fill it out by hand, they listed their website so there was the  option to fill it out online OR they could scan the code with their smartphone and fill it out right then and there. By giving options, you’re not leaving anyone out.

To add personalization to your mailer, use VDP (Variable Data Printing). VDP allows each direct mail piece to  be individualized to the recipient; it “let’s your company continue its Direct Mail printing while adding variable factors such as your costumer’s name, address and a personalized message that directs every individual consumer in a different way. Response rates proved that when consumers receive a letter directed to them personally,with a private name and address . . . they are most likely to open it and give it a closer look.” (Directmailinsider.com, 2011).

If you have questions about generating QR Codes or using VDP in your next mailing, contact us.  

 

Melanson, D. (2011). Comscore finds 6.2 percent of smartphone users scan the QR codes. Retrieved September 14, 2011, from http://www.engadget.com/2011/08/13/comscore-finds-6-2-percent-of-smartphone-users-scan-qr-codes/

NewPage & Education (2010). Big Change. NewPage Corporation. (#14 Getting Personal).

Retrieved September 14, 2011, from http://www.directmailinsider.com/articles/what-is-vdp-variable-data-printing-and-how-can-it-help-your-business/

Keeping it Classy

 Black and white printing is a classy way to portray depth of emotions and “color”. When using only black ink on white paper, your images have the ability to appear in the broad range of grayscale which gives it that classy look. What allows the printed copy and photos to appear in grayscale are the thickness of the dots. There are always 300 dots per inch (dpi), but the thickness of the dots allows for more ink to be placed on the paper – more ink, the more black it appears.

Prairie Country, Then and Now is a book about railroads and trains between the time frames of 1969-1973 and 2007-2010. The book is in all black and white. One of the authors of Prairie Country, Then and Now, Robert P. Olmsted, had this to say about the printing of his book;

” . . . I would like to thank the pressmen who handled the job, as it was obvious every effort was made to give me the ‘black’ blacks I feel are essential to good B&W work.”

Check out the photos below of Lance Detwieler, the one color pressman, and Dwight Voth, a Printing Consultant!

The buttons he is pushing allow him to adjust the density of the ink.

This photo is of Lance and Dwight Voth, Mr. Olmsted and South Platte Press' Printing Consultant, checking out the press sheet.

Lance using a loupe, a high-powered magnifying glass used by printers and those in the graphic industry. He is analyzing the quality and precision of the dot pattern.

Lance is putting in a new plate for the next set of press sheets. The plates are made of a flexible aluminum that has had the image put onto it using Computer to Plate (CTP) technology. The blue areas on the plate receive the ink to print the photos and text onto the paper.